Binge Drinking linked to Spike in Liver Cancer Deaths

Fig. 1.). Beer Street & Gin Lane by William Hogarth, London 1751This reminds me of the Good Old Days of Gin Lane in 1751. In England, in the late 1700’s there was a Gin Mania. Over 9000 people died that year, this includes children. The consumption rate was at 2.2 gallons a person a year. During The Medieval times children were allowed to drink. As a matter of fact todlers were introduced to wine directly after breast milk. In Old Europe wine was water and it was also sweetened with Sapa thats lead acetate which can substitute sugar.

Now 1751 is more of a time period when civil practices were being embedded into society. Right before the Victorian era. So we must understand that our modern civilization is a recycle of practices from Medieval times. The Gin epidemic is the most extreme event related to alcoholism that I have encountered during my research. I ran into a court case which described a woman abandoning her child in the winter forest with no clothing till the death as she sold her sons clothes for some gin. She was later hung.

Todays influence of alcoholism on the Generation X children comez from many places. Everything from drunk mice in cartoons to a frog saying bud. The biggest alcohol download into the psyche of the kids was the overt usage of the word “Mountain Dew”. Mountain Dew was a term used in the 1600s and it means “Whiskey”. The making of liqour is considered to be an Art in Europe similar to our American attitude with beer. You can clean your liver and the heavy metals/toxins out of your mind with wormwood and goldenseal tea. Every now and again a college student overdoes it. But, now the stresses of life have overdone humans and we choose to eleviate or woes with drunken debauch. Nonetheless, We Will Taste The Devils Juice, As It Is The Mother to All Vices.

Drink Responsibly……………

https://www.yahoo.com/news/dramatic-spike-liver-disease-deaths-linked-binge-drinking-204105158.html

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